FREE Fairfax County Pest Wildlife Resources

FREE HELP: Virginia Wildlife Commission: 804-367-0909

The Virginia Wildlife Commission, also known as the Virginia Department of Fish & Game or the Virginia Wildlife Conservation Office, provides free resources for pest wildlife, or conflict or nuisance wildlife, as it is also called. They can send an officer to address certain wildlife issues, or provide other resources for the control of nuisance wildlife species, and provide help to the residents of Fairfax County with certain wildlife problems. You can reach their offices by calling 804-367-0909. Visit them at https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/

FREE HELP: Fairfax County Animal Control: 703-830-1100

Fairfax County Animal Control Services most commonly help with domestic animals, such as stray cats or dangerous dogs. They also might help with wildlife issues in various capacities. Call your local office for a description of services. Visit https://www.fairfaxva.gov/government/police/animal-control. If that doesn't work, click here for the Fairfax County police dept, who can provide free Fairfax County wildlife control - but read my explanation.

FREE HELP: Fairfax County Wildlife Rehabilitation: (202) 882-1000

Fairfax County Wildlife Rehabilitators usually work with injured, orphaned, or sick wildlife. They will often help with wildlife issues and concerns. It is nice to give them donations for their help and wildlife rehab efforts. Visit City Wildlife Inc at https://citywildlife.org/about/us/

PAY SERVICE: ACS Wildlife Removal: 703-881-3164

ACS Wildlife Removal is a private wildlife control business that charges for critter removal in Fairfax County. ACS Wildlife Removal is available 24-7-365 and provides same-day wildlife removal services, including the removal of animals inside attics, rodent removal, and more.



If you have an animal problem and need assistance, there are several free animal control resources in Fairfax County, Virginia. The first thing you can try is your local Fairfax County animal services, or the free Fairfax County animal control services by calling 703-830-1100. They may be able to help you with your critter problem, and possibly offer free raccoon removal or free snake removal. But they primarily deal with dogs and cats, and might not help with wildlife. For wildlife-specifice issues, try the Virginia Wildlife Commission at 804-367-0909. They do free wildlife control in Fairfax County and all of Virginia. But they often deal with special cases like bears, or illegal hunting. They might not help you with specific cases in your house, like free rodent control or free squirrel removal. At a more local level, you can call Fairfax County Wildlife Rehabilitation at (202) 882-1000 for local free animal removal and trapping, and they may help with providing free critter removal in Fairfax County. But this organization, like all wildlife rehab, mostly focuses on healing and caring for sick or injured wildlife. There's no business that provides free pest control in Fairfax County that will remove wild animals that I know of, like free bat control or free rat removal. Sometimes, for a case of animals in an attic, or wildlife problems on private property, you need to hire and pay for wildlife removal, and if so, I recommend ACS Wildlife Removal at 703-881-3164. Some people wonder if animal control costs money, or how much does animal removal cost. For that, call 703-881-3164 and ask. Of course, you can be sure to get free pest wildlife removal if you solve the problem yourself, so read my Do-It-Yourself page for more hints. Finally, you can call the local Fairfax County police department. Click here for Fairfax County police department animal removal and for a short explanation.

Fairfax County wildlife issues:

This combination will give him four directions and, although they are not exact by the compass, they are exact enough to help him out of the suburban neighborhood. Personally, I have never been lost, but I have been turned around so often that I no longer try to keep track of my directions while removing unwanted Fairfax County wildlife. It always has thus far. Some emergency equipment should always be carried by any who enters the suburban neighborhood. Besides to be included an ample supply of matches in a waterproof container, a good heavy scathe knife or belt axe, and a lunch of some sort. Years ago, I was present while a guide dressed a conflict animal.

He had a beautiful removing unwanted wildlife knife on his belt, but when he started to dress the pest critter, he reached in his pocket for a well-worn pocket knife. When I asked him why he carried a removing unwanted Fairfax County wildlife knife and didn't use it, he told me that he preferred the pocket knife for dressing nuisance critters and carried the larger knife to use in case of an emergency, more as a hand axe than a knife. He could use It to cut poles and neighborhood for bed and shelter to cut poles for shelter, to make splints in case of broken bones and to cut and split small critter traps for a fire. He also said that it makes a guide look more professional if he carries a good removing unwanted wildlife knife. I have a pocketknife with a three-inch blade which I have to suburban Fairfax County neighborhood-dress perhaps twenty-five nuisance wildlife and I have often used this same knife to skin and cut them up after. I find that it is plenty large enough for this, and that it is much safer to use for cutting, when I am removing the viscera of a conflict animal. I like to have a removing unwanted wildlife knife on me for emergency use.

I have started on a days trap many times without having lunch but find that something to eat at midday makes the afternoon removing unwanted Fairfax County wildlife less tiring and more enjoyable. I usually carry a couple of sandwiches, but when I am in the big suburban neighborhood, I prefer something more lasting. Often, I have carried bars of chocolate and/or a box of raisins. These are well known rations and there seems to be a surprising amount of energy in a handful of raisins or a bar of chocolate. At one time I carried a homemade emergency ration, made of ground parched corn, whole-milli powder and grated chocolate. A half cup of this, with a handful of raisins and plenty of water, would see me through from one meal time to the next. I could carry supply in a small waterproof sack and, while I never had any real need for this ration, it was a comforting thing to have. I have never tried any of the rations used by the armed forces but there is a possibility that some of them might fit into the picture.

FREE HELP: Virginia Wildlife Commission: 804-367-0909
FREE HELP: Fairfax County Animal Control: 703-830-1100
FREE HELP: Fairfax County Wildlife Rehabilitation: (202) 882-1000
FREE HELP: Fairfax County police department: (703) 591-0966
PAY SERVICE: ACS Wildlife Removal: 703-881-3164

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