FREE Charlottesville Pest Wildlife Resources

FREE HELP: Virginia Wildlife Commission: 804-367-0909

The Virginia Wildlife Commission, also known as the Virginia Department of Fish & Game or the Virginia Wildlife Conservation Office, provides free resources for pest wildlife, or conflict or nuisance wildlife, as it is also called. They can send an officer to address certain wildlife issues, or provide other resources for the control of nuisance wildlife species, and provide help to the residents of Charlottesville with certain wildlife problems. You can reach their offices by calling 804-367-0909. Visit them at https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/

FREE HELP: Albemarle County Animal Control: (434) 970-3280

Albemarle County Animal Control Services most commonly help with domestic animals, such as stray cats or dangerous dogs. They also might help with wildlife issues in various capacities. Call your local office for a description of services. Visit www.charlottesville.org/departments-and-services/city-services/animal-control. If that doesn't work, click here for the Charlottesville police dept, who can provide free Charlottesville wildlife control - but read my explanation.

FREE HELP: Charlottesville Wildlife Rehabilitation: (540) 942-9453

Charlottesville Wildlife Rehabilitators usually work with injured, orphaned, or sick wildlife. They will often help with wildlife issues and concerns. It is nice to give them donations for their help and wildlife rehab efforts. Visit Wildlife Center of VA at https://www.wildlifecenter.org/

PAY SERVICE: Virginia Professional Wildlife Removal Services: 434-333-7605

Virginia Professional Wildlife Removal Services is a private wildlife control business that charges for critter removal in Charlottesville. Virginia Professional Wildlife Removal Services is available 24-7-365 and provides same-day wildlife removal services, including the removal of animals inside attics, rodent removal, and more.



If you have an animal problem and need assistance, there are several free animal control resources in Charlottesville, Virginia. The first thing you can try is your local Albemarle County animal services, or the free Charlottesville animal control services by calling (434) 970-3280. They may be able to help you with your critter problem, and possibly offer free raccoon removal or free snake removal. But they primarily deal with dogs and cats, and might not help with wildlife. For wildlife-specifice issues, try the Virginia Wildlife Commission at 804-367-0909. They do free wildlife control in Charlottesville and all of Virginia. But they often deal with special cases like bears, or illegal hunting. They might not help you with specific cases in your house, like free rodent control or free squirrel removal. At a more local level, you can call Charlottesville Wildlife Rehabilitation at (540) 942-9453 for local free animal removal and trapping, and they may help with providing free critter removal in Charlottesville. But this organization, like all wildlife rehab, mostly focuses on healing and caring for sick or injured wildlife. There's no business that provides free pest control in Charlottesville that will remove wild animals that I know of, like free bat control or free rat removal. Sometimes, for a case of animals in an attic, or wildlife problems on private property, you need to hire and pay for wildlife removal, and if so, I recommend Virginia Professional Wildlife Removal Services at 434-333-7605. Some people wonder if animal control costs money, or how much does animal removal cost. For that, call 434-333-7605 and ask. Of course, you can be sure to get free pest wildlife removal if you solve the problem yourself, so read my Do-It-Yourself page for more hints. Finally, you can call the local Charlottesville police department. Click here for Charlottesville police department animal removal and for a short explanation.

Charlottesville wildlife issues:

While a man is looking for rabbits, other Charlottesville animals should not be overlooked, for almost anything which lives may be eaten, if he is hungry enough to try it. If the lost man has any knowledge of the construction of snares and dead-falls, it might be well to utilize this knowledge to obtain food. Rabbits are comparatively easy to snare if there are any handy. Squirrels may be caught on a tree or sapling which leans toward another tree, thus giving the animals an easy inclined path to the larger tree. Other animals are more difficult to snare, but a deadfall, set on a path used by porcupines, should be effective. The great advantage in using snares and deadfalls is that they work while the nuisance Charlottesville wildlife control professional sleeps.

Paruidges (grouse), if they can be found, make a tasty and satisfying meal. In the deep suburban neighborhood they are not as wild as they are in sealed country and they may often be effort to remove a pest animal with a pest exclusion device. Squirrels are good food. The big greys are best, but the little red ones are good if they can be effort to remove a pest animal in the head so that there is something left to eat. Perhaps the porcupine which is effort to remove a pest animal from a tall tree turns out to be a raccoon. All the better, or worse? A young Charlottesville raccoon is perhaps more palatable than an old porcupine, but an old raccoon is something that only a time of yeared stomach can handle. Mink and weasels are not edible except to a man who is so starved that he is insensible to the odor. I have seen foxes eaten, so they must be edible. But I don't want to be hungry enough to relish one. Frog legs are a possibility for the lost man. Frogs may be found buried in the mud of springs.

Theyre hibernating amphibians and may not be anything like the delicacies from the southern areas, but even the smaller ones are just as nourishing frogs, not toads. If the nuisance wildlife control professional doesn't know the difference, it is better to forget about the frog legs. If there is a sluggish stream or marsh handy it might pay to look for muskrats. These Charlottesville animals are working hard during the pest critter removing unwanted wildlife time of year, preparing for winter, and may often be seen in the daytime. If effort to remove a pest animal in the head, they will float. Reviving may be a problem. If the wind is in the right direction, they will float near enough to shore so that they may be reached with a pole. When cleaning muskrats, remove all glands and fat from the carcass.

FREE HELP: Virginia Wildlife Commission: 804-367-0909
FREE HELP: Albemarle County Animal Control: (434) 970-3280
FREE HELP: Charlottesville Wildlife Rehabilitation: (540) 942-9453
FREE HELP: Charlottesville police department: (843) 577-7434
PAY SERVICE: Virginia Professional Wildlife Removal Services: 434-333-7605

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