FREE Tulsa Pest Wildlife Resources

FREE HELP: Oklahoma Wildlife Commission: (918) 857-5557

The Oklahoma Wildlife Commission, also known as the Oklahoma Department of Fish & Game or the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Office, provides free resources for pest wildlife, or conflict or nuisance wildlife, as it is also called. They can send an officer to address certain wildlife issues, or provide other resources for the control of nuisance wildlife species, and provide help to the residents of Tulsa with certain wildlife problems. You can reach their offices by calling (918) 857-5557. Visit them at https://www.wildlifedepartment.com/

FREE HELP: Tulsa County Animal Control: 918-495-3647

Tulsa County Animal Control Services most commonly help with domestic animals, such as stray cats or dangerous dogs. They also might help with wildlife issues in various capacities. Call your local office for a description of services. Visit https://www.cityoftulsa.org/government/departments/working-in-neighborhoods/animal-welfare/. If that doesn't work, click here for the Tulsa police dept, who can provide free Tulsa wildlife control - but read my explanation.

FREE HELP: Tulsa Wildlife Rehabilitation: (918) 688-8337

Tulsa Wildlife Rehabilitators usually work with injured, orphaned, or sick wildlife. They will often help with wildlife issues and concerns. It is nice to give them donations for their help and wildlife rehab efforts. Visit Foundation for Environment & Wildlife at https://www.countyoffice.org/fewerr-foundation-for-environment-wildlife-bat-rescue-tulsa-ok-0ab/

PAY SERVICE: Wildlife X Team: 918-900-6170

Wildlife X Team is a private wildlife control business that charges for critter removal in Tulsa. Wildlife X Team is available 24-7-365 and provides same-day wildlife removal services, including the removal of animals inside attics, rodent removal, and more.



If you have an animal problem and need assistance, there are several free animal control resources in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The first thing you can try is your local Tulsa County animal services, or the free Tulsa animal control services by calling 918-495-3647. They may be able to help you with your critter problem, and possibly offer free raccoon removal or free snake removal. But they primarily deal with dogs and cats, and might not help with wildlife. For wildlife-specifice issues, try the Oklahoma Wildlife Commission at (918) 857-5557. They do free wildlife control in Tulsa and all of Oklahoma. But they often deal with special cases like bears, or illegal hunting. They might not help you with specific cases in your house, like free rodent control or free squirrel removal. At a more local level, you can call Tulsa Wildlife Rehabilitation at (918) 688-8337 for local free animal removal and trapping, and they may help with providing free critter removal in Tulsa. But this organization, like all wildlife rehab, mostly focuses on healing and caring for sick or injured wildlife. There's no business that provides free pest control in Tulsa that will remove wild animals that I know of, like free bat control or free rat removal. Sometimes, for a case of animals in an attic, or wildlife problems on private property, you need to hire and pay for wildlife removal, and if so, I recommend Wildlife X Team at 918-900-6170. Some people wonder if animal control costs money, or how much does animal removal cost. For that, call 918-900-6170 and ask. Of course, you can be sure to get free pest wildlife removal if you solve the problem yourself, so read my Do-It-Yourself page for more hints. Finally, you can call the local Tulsa police department. Click here for Tulsa police department animal removal and for a short explanation.

Tulsa wildlife issues:

Planning for a trap of this sort should be done as soon as a conflict animal has been in a patch of suburban neighborhood or as soon as tracks are discovered which indicate the presence of nuisance Tulsa wildlife in the area. The first thing pest control operators want to know is where the pest critter will go, if started. This is hard to predict if the animal is a lone pest animal, but it is better than an even chance that he will join a raccoon at the first opportunity a does probable course may be predetermined, if the pest control operators have a fair knowledge of the range of the pest critter in that vicinity and of the pals which they usually follow.

There is always a good chance of error which should be corrected as soon as the pest critter's actions are revealed. For instance, it might be assumed at the beginning of a trap that the pest critter being followed are nuisance Tulsa wildlife which, belong on a range which is mostly to the northeast of the pest critter's location. But after following the pest critter for a time, we find from the course of their neighborhood that they are heading for e range that is southeast of the area. There is no object in following these nuisance wildlife until the watchers have been changed to a new position where they may intercept the pest critter on their new course. It is usually safe to leave a doe's track long enough to warn the watchers of any change of plan, for raccoon seldom travel far unless followed. A lone Tulsa pest animal is a different proposition and will travel for greater distances regardless of the nuisance wildlife control professional's actions. Three of us found the tracks of a raccoon and a young pest animal where they had crossed a north and south road.

I knew of such a pair of nuisance wildlife which had a range in the area leers of that road. As these nuisance wildlife were headed northeast, I assumed that they were those nuisance wildlife and that they would re-cross the road if followed. There were two crossings north of the place where the Tulsa pest critter had crossed, one about a half-mile and the other nearly a mile away. I decided that these nuisance wildlife would not use the nearer of the two crossings because it was close to a house and was seldom used except at night and then mostly by nuisance wildlife which were traveling to the east. I sent my companions to the other crossing without giving them any reasons for thinking nuisance wildlife would use that place.

FREE HELP: Oklahoma Wildlife Commission: (918) 857-5557
FREE HELP: Tulsa County Animal Control: 918-495-3647
FREE HELP: Tulsa Wildlife Rehabilitation: (918) 688-8337
FREE HELP: Tulsa police department: (918) 586-6000
PAY SERVICE: Wildlife X Team: 918-900-6170

© 2019 Free wildlife control in Tulsa, OK