FREE Lowell Pest Wildlife Resources

FREE HELP: Massachusetts Wildlife Commission: 508-389-6317

The Massachusetts Wildlife Commission, also known as the Massachusetts Department of Fish & Game or the Massachusetts Wildlife Conservation Office, provides free resources for pest wildlife, or conflict or nuisance wildlife, as it is also called. They can send an officer to address certain wildlife issues, or provide other resources for the control of nuisance wildlife species, and provide help to the residents of Lowell with certain wildlife problems. You can reach their offices by calling 508-389-6317. Visit them at https://www.mass.gov/orgs/department-of-fish-and-game

FREE HELP: Middlesex County Animal Control: 978-970-3321

Middlesex County Animal Control Services most commonly help with domestic animals, such as stray cats or dangerous dogs. They also might help with wildlife issues in various capacities. Call your local office for a description of services. Visit https://www.lowellma.gov/299/Animal-Control. If that doesn't work, click here for the Lowell police dept, who can provide free Lowell wildlife control - but read my explanation.

FREE HELP: Lowell Wildlife Rehabilitation: (978) 970-3321

Lowell Wildlife Rehabilitators usually work with injured, orphaned, or sick wildlife. They will often help with wildlife issues and concerns. It is nice to give them donations for their help and wildlife rehab efforts. Visit Animal Control at

PAY SERVICE: Bay State Wildlife: 617-939-9710

Bay State Wildlife is a private wildlife control business that charges for critter removal in Lowell. Bay State Wildlife is available 24-7-365 and provides same-day wildlife removal services, including the removal of animals inside attics, rodent removal, and more.



If you have an animal problem and need assistance, there are several free animal control resources in Lowell, Massachusetts. The first thing you can try is your local Middlesex County animal services, or the free Lowell animal control services by calling 978-970-3321. They may be able to help you with your critter problem, and possibly offer free raccoon removal or free snake removal. But they primarily deal with dogs and cats, and might not help with wildlife. For wildlife-specifice issues, try the Massachusetts Wildlife Commission at 508-389-6317. They do free wildlife control in Lowell and all of Massachusetts. But they often deal with special cases like bears, or illegal hunting. They might not help you with specific cases in your house, like free rodent control or free squirrel removal. At a more local level, you can call Lowell Wildlife Rehabilitation at (978) 970-3321 for local free animal removal and trapping, and they may help with providing free critter removal in Lowell. But this organization, like all wildlife rehab, mostly focuses on healing and caring for sick or injured wildlife. There's no business that provides free pest control in Lowell that will remove wild animals that I know of, like free bat control or free rat removal. Sometimes, for a case of animals in an attic, or wildlife problems on private property, you need to hire and pay for wildlife removal, and if so, I recommend Bay State Wildlife at 617-939-9710. Some people wonder if animal control costs money, or how much does animal removal cost. For that, call 617-939-9710 and ask. Of course, you can be sure to get free pest wildlife removal if you solve the problem yourself, so read my Do-It-Yourself page for more hints. Finally, you can call the local Lowell police department. Click here for Lowell police department animal removal and for a short explanation.

Lowell wildlife issues:

All things in nature must balance and if the Lowell pest critter population becomes too large, nature will call a halt in one way or another. It is up to the states to see that this normal abundance is maintained, and the herds are kept within their natural limits. The only way to do this, now that most of their natural enemies have been controlled, is to permit an annual humanely trap and relocate that will equal the annual increase. In their efforts to protect the pest critter herds, the different states have enacted different laws, but these laws are similar in that they all permit a short open time of year and they impose a definite bag limit. Some of these restrictions were adopted on an experimental basis and have never been revised. Some of these have proved sound while others are of doubtful value, due in part to the lack of definite biological knowledge of the animals. I have always been doubtful of the value of the so-called "pest animal law" that has been used by several sites over the years. Here in Maine, we allow the taking of one nuisance Lowell wildlife of any size or sex and our herd has prospered.

In at least one other state, the herd has increased, apparently at the expense of the individual nuisance wildlifes vitality. Most of these laws are in the interest of conservation and sportsmanship. The least sporting methods of nuisance wildlife removing unwanted wildlife are usually banned by law not entirely because they are not sporting, but because they are the most successful and therefore the most detrimental to the efforts of maintaining the pest critter population and to continued removing unwanted wildlife. Night removing unwanted Lowell wildlife, probably the most successful method of taking nuisance wildlife, was one of the first to be banned. My first experience with this type of removing unwanted wildlife or "art was when I was sixteen. I was working on a-small construction project in the deep suburban neighborhood of one of the more popular nuisance wildlife removing unwanted wildlife regions. I do not know what the law was at that time, but it was the custom to supplement the commissary with nuisance wildlife meat.

We had a regular nuisance wildlife control professional as some of the carriers had, but one of the men had made a salt lick a short distance from pest control headquarters and, as he worked all day, the only time that he could visit the lick was at night. I went with him one night when he humanely trap and relocateed a conflict animal. We were equipped with a miner's acetylene lamp and pest exclusion device. We waited on a platform in a tree until a conflict Lowell animal showed up and then he effort to remove a pest animal the animal. There was no pretense of sport in the humanely catching. It was simply the humanely catching of an animal for its meat in the surest and easiest way. Since then I have seen many refinements added to this type of removing unwanted wildlife.

FREE HELP: Massachusetts Wildlife Commission: 508-389-6317
FREE HELP: Middlesex County Animal Control: 978-970-3321
FREE HELP: Lowell Wildlife Rehabilitation: (978) 970-3321
FREE HELP: Lowell police department: (978) 937-3200
PAY SERVICE: Bay State Wildlife: 617-939-9710

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